Benjamin Ferencz

A Former Prosecutor at the Nuremberg War Crimes Trials
About Ben

Law. Not War.

Beginning in 1945 with his prosecution of war criminals during the Nuremberg Tribunal, the work of Benjamin Ferencz has long focused on issues of international criminal justice and world peace. A strong supporter of the International Criminal Court, Mr. Ferencz advocates steps to replace the “rule of force with the rule of law.”  This website is devoted to his life’s work. LAW. NOT WAR.

News

Recent news

June 29, 2020

50 National Security Lawyers urge Trump to rescind sanctions and travel bans for International Criminal Court

A group of 175 legal scholars and lawyers specializing in international law have urged President Trump to rescind his authorization of sanctions and visa denials for International Criminal Court ...
May 7, 2020

The devastation of World War II in Europe ended 75 years ago

From The Washington Post: "Sgt. Benjamin Ferencz, a future Nuremberg war crimes prosecutor, wrote his fiancee: “There were no wild shouts, no hurrahs, no tearing of paper and confetti. … The ...
March 11, 2020

Benjamin Ferencz: The last surviving Nuremberg prosecutor

At 27, he took on the Nazis in the courtroom at Nuremberg and has been fighting for justice ever since. Read article here. by Gregory Gordon & Mia Swart for Al Jazeera
March 9, 2020

"Mister Nuernberg" will den Frieden: Der Chefankläger der Nürnberger Prozesse, Benjamin Ferencz, wird 100 Jahre alt

Netflix hat eine Serie über sein Leben im Programm. Ben Ferencz hat den schlimmsten Verbrechern in die Augen gesehen, hat gestohlene Schätze gefunden, Staatsmänner getroffen und arbeitet bis ...
November 1, 2019

Obama Quotes Ferencz in Farewell Address to Military

We are a nation that stands for the rule of law and strength in the law of war. When the Nazis were defeated, we put them on trial. Some couldn’t understand that; it had never happened before. ...
May 25, 2019

Ben Ferencz Delivers Remarks in Rome 1998

Just added to the YouTube channel: Ferencz at the 1998 Rome Conference that established the International Criminal Court.

“The world remains a very dangerous place. New weapons of devastating power threaten human survival directly, and, through their destabilizing effects on societies, indirectly. Many young people in many lands are ready to kill and be killed for the particular cause of their ideology or nation. Despite such obstacles, the spirit of Nuremberg lives on. It is increasingly recognized that international disputes can and must be settled without the use of armed might.”

—Benjamin B. Ferencz, 2010